The Nitty Gritty of Children's Writing

Recreating

idea-152213_1280.png
We see the word recreating and usually think "kicking back" or doing something for the enjoyment of it, as in recreation, and that's true.

But, what if we pronounce the word re-creating?

Re-creating could be a "big picture" look at a novel. Sometimes, we honestly know a manuscript we've written isn't working. Sometimes, it's our critique group, agent, or an editor who points out big problems. Either way, re-creating can include slashing scenes/chapters, or creating brand new ones. We might need to re-create our character, who is either too flawed or not flawed enough, or not likable enough. We might have to re-create plot, or fix the tension or chronology in the story. It might take starting the story in a different place or at a different time. We may be restoring the story to fit the bright shiny vision we first had. Re-creating might change the whole story into a different shape. It may feel like going backwards. But if the end result is a better story, it's worth it. I love this quote: "Don't hold onto a mistake just because it took a long time to make." -Lucy Ruth Cummins

Once the overall story is working well, then we can move on to scene by scene revisions. With this step, we might be strengthening our characters, going deeper into their emotions and motives. Perhaps we're adding in sensory details that ground the reader or removing unnecessary description. Is a conversation compelling or is there trite dialogue that needs to be cut? Is everything in a scene necessary? If not, take it out.

Next is revising individual paragraphs and line by line editing. We refresh tired words, overused phrases, and check the pacing of our sentences. It might include tightening. Our goal is to make the words stronger, clearer, and more compelling. Here's a great quote I found on twitter: "I keep going over a sentence. I nag it, gnaw it, pat and flatter it." -Janet Flanner

We may not do our revising in such separate steps, but however it's done, it's necessary. I like what Linda W. Jackson says, "First drafts are paper plates. After many revisions, they become fine china." Now that's quite the re-creation!

Recently I was recreating, as on vacation, where I got to add another state to my list of those visited. Which reminds me that sometimes it's time to visit a new project--not just return to those we've written before, or those in progress. In that case we are re-creating the story from our mind onto the page or screen. (At least if you're like me, they're always different in my imagination than what ends up in actual words.)

Sometimes, we're re-creating ourselves as we try something new. I remember hearing Kirby Larson talk about taking a poetry class while working on a novel. That something new helped her write her Newbery Honor book Hattie Big Sky.

And back to the usual definition of recreating. We do all need time away from our writing so that we can come back refreshed and ready to go.