Article Writing for Kids' Magazines

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Writing nonfiction for magazines is a good way to break into print. Editors get less article submissions than they do fiction.

Often editors tell you what they are looking for. For example, Highlights for Children posts their current needs on submittable. Their info was updated in November. Jack and Jill submission guidelines state: "We are especially interested in features or Q&As with regular kids (or groups of kids) in the Jack and Jill age group who are engaged in unusual, challenging, or interesting activities." Root and Star is looking for nonfiction about water for their July/August 2019 issue (deadline end of March).

You may be familiar with big name magazines, but how do you find the smaller or lesser known ones? Via online sources such as Evelyn B. Christensen's site. Or this resource, Magazine Markets for Children's Writers that comes out annually. Check out libraries and bookstores to see physical copies of print magazines as well. Then you can search online for these magazines' submission guidelines.

You've chosen a market, and even a topic, now what? Research. Here are some things to keep in mind:


  • Don't solely use internet sources. Editors will appreciate that you've used books, magazines, interviews, etc.

  • Wikipedia is only useful in giving you an overview that may or may not be accurate, and when you use it to follow up with the sources listed at the bottom of an article.

  • As you take notes, record where you got the information. You'll send the bibliography of your sources with your article. There are now apps and software that can keep track of this information for you. This site lists some options.

  • Using quotes in an article can really bring it to life. Copy these verbatim as you research.

  • Be prepared that your research might take you in a different direction from your plan.

  • Go deep with research and you may find some fascinating facts that will make your article pop.

Here's a great resource on finding credible sources.

Before you write your article, ask yourself, "What is the main point I want to get across to my reader?" With that in mind you will create a more focused piece.

Next, get organized. Create a simple outline. It can be as basic as:
• Introduction
• Section one (be specific to your topic!)
• Section two
• Section three
• Conclusion

Now write your first draft.

When finished, make sure each paragraph (or two) fits the topic of the outlined section. (It's okay to adjust your outline, but paragraphs should have a mini-theme. Some magazines even use headers for sections and your simple outline can become those headers.)

Check the beginning. Is your title intriguing in some way? Does the opening draw a reader in? It could ask a question, be a short anecdote, make a provocative statement, etc.

Is the middle meaty? Full of good details? Interesting? More than what is general public knowledge.

Check the end. Does your article have a satisfying conclusion or just dribble to a stop? Sometimes, articles conclude with a statement that makes the piece feel it has come full circle--or in other words, the end ties back to the beginning.

Prepare your bibliography. There are many online resources on how to write one, but this website has links to how to include almost anything.

After setting your article aside for a week or two, come back and revise. If you have a critique group or beta readers, share and revise again.

Prepare to send...

Double check that:
• your article fits the required word count of the magazine.
• the accuracy of your quotes.
• the magazine's deadline hasn't passed.
• how to submit (electronically, through a form, via postal mail).
• write a query or cover letter, if necessary, and proofread carefully.
• read your article through one more time, checking for grammar and spelling errors.
• proof your bibliography.

Send. And make up a list of possible other places to send the article to if you get a rejection. (This may require further revisions or slanting.)

If you get an acceptance, celebrate! You're a soon-to-be published (or republished) author.

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