Results matching “diversity”

Just Under the Clouds

JustUndertheClouds.jpgI loved Just Under the Clouds (Alfred A. Knopf, 2018) by Melissa Sarno. It's such a good book. And has a gorgeous cover.

Twelve-year-old Cora and her family, consisting of her mother and her sister Adare, have been moving from place to place for six years since Daddy died. Now they're homeless. Cora gets comfort from knowing and climbing trees in Brooklyn, just like her father taught her. But with watching her "different" sister while Mom works, and struggling with algebra in school, Cora worries they'll never belong anywhere.

Just Under the Clouds is the author's debut novel. Read about the birth of the story here. Her next book, A Swirl of Ocean, comes out in late summer and I'm really looking forward to it. Read more about Melissa here.

Amal Unbound

Amal-Unbound.jpgAmal Unbound (Nancy Paulsen Books, 2018) by Aisha Saeed is SO Good! I'd been hearing a lot about this New York Times bestseller and am really glad I've now read it.

Twelve-year-old Amal loves school, but now she has to stay home and watch her little sisters while her mother recovers from the birth of another baby. Amal wants to be a teacher herself someday, so missing this much school is worrying. Her dreams are shattered one day when she is rude to the wrong man--a member of the ruling family in their Pakistani village. For her effrontery, she is taken away from home to be Jawad Sahib's servant. How can she survive the intrigue among the Khan's servants? Will she ever be allowed to return home?

This book would make a fantastic movie. As my previous recommendation, I wish kids all over America could read it.

Previously, I've recommended Aisha's YA novel, Written in the Stars. You can read about it here.

I love this list of Fourteen Things about the author.

Front Desk

Front Desk.pngFront Desk (Arthur A. Levine Books, 2018) by Kelly Yang is a book I wish everyone could read. (Especially those who take what they have for granted...)

Mia Tang's parents told her that America was this amazing place. But so far, no house, no dog, and very little money. Ten-year-old Mia doesn't want the kids at school to know where she lives--a motel, but better than when they lived in their car. She does like working the front desk. And making new friends Although she wishes she could speak native English. And write it, too.

But Mr. Yao, the motel owner, is making it harder and harder on her parents. Will they all have to move and find jobs yet again?

Front Desk was named a "Best Book" many times over. See them all here.

Read the real story behind this wonderful story.

Besides being a children's author, Kelly is a journalist and educator. Read more here.

Somewhere Among

SomewhereAmong.jpgSomewhere Among (A Caitlyn Dlouhy Book, 2016) by Annie Donwerth-Chikamatsu is such a good book. It's told in verse and the sparse language works so well.

Ema has a Japanese father and an American mother. Usually, she gets to spend the end of the summer in California with her mom and Grandpa Bob and Nana. But this year, her mother is expecting a baby and needs rest, so beginning in June, she and Ema will stay with Jiichan and Obaachan in western Tokyo. And it's not going to be easy--especially with Papa working so far away. Then shortly after school starts, the whole world changes with the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11, 2001.

Listen to Ema herself:

At home
with Mom and Papa

I am
between

two cultures
two languages
two time zones
every day.

Everywhere I go
here or there
I am different.

Doesn't that just pull your heartstrings?

Read about the author and her family here.

A Big Mooncake for Little Star

Perfect Picture Book Friday

BigMooncake.jpgA Big Mooncake for Little Star (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2018) by Grace Lin is such a lovely book. It reads like a legend that has been passed down generation after generation.

Little Star's mama bakes her a Big Mooncake and lays it onto the night sky to cool. Little Star promises not to touch it until Mama says she can. But . . . in the middle of the night, all Little Star can think of is the Mooncake. She thinks Mama won't notice if she takes a tiny nibble. Then the next night she remembers how sweet and tasty that one bite was. And the next night, and the night after that . . .

Little Star is adorable. I like the repetition in the story. I love the bright art on a black background. I love the ending. The book is sweet and tasty! Read the dust jacket where Grace talks about what inspired this story--it's very cool.

Grace Lin is an award winning author. Where the Mountain Meets the Moon is a Newbery Honor book. All Grace's books are books for the child she was who didn't have books that represented her. You can hear more about the author/illustrator in this touching Ted Talk here.

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