Results matching “diversity”

Warcross

Warcross_final.jpgI loved Warcross (G.P. Putnam's Sons, 2017) by Marie Lu and am thrilled there's a sequel coming soon.

Emika Chen is a hacker and bounty hunter who is down on her luck. Frustrated she hacks into the International Warcross Championship and is seen! Instead of being arrested, she's contacted by her idol Hideo Tanaka, the creator of Warcross. He flies her from NY to Tokyo where he asks her to be a spy in the tournaments of this popular virtual reality video game. Emika is in even before she sees the promised bounty.

Fun, action, danger, and even romance is in this near future sci-fi that moves rapidiy. I did not want to put this thriller down. And what a shocker ending!

Wildcard, comes out in September! (Love that cover! I know. I'm gushing. But you don't want to miss this duology.) Wildcard_3d.png






Read about Marie Lu's other books here.

Hello, Universe

hello universe.jpgHello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly is the 2018 Newbery Medal winner and such a fun read. I loved the multiple viewpoints and how the characters are brought together despite their aloneness.

First, we meet shy Virgil Salinas, whose own family doesn't seem to understand his quietness. He feels "like unbuttered toast standing next to them." And they call him Turtle. Only his grandmother, newly from the Philippines, seems to get him.

Next up is Valencia Somerset who is struggling with a repetitive nightmare where she is all alone. She's adopted a dog who lives in the woods and sneaks off to feed him.

Then we meet Kaori Tanaka, with her powers of second sight and her younger sister, Gen, who helps her out preparing for clients.

And, of course, there's the bully--Chet Bullens--aka the Bull--who plays an important role in this story of young middle schoolers on summer break.

Each character was unique and interesting, and yet so identifiable. Except for the bully, of course.

This is Erin's third book. Go here to read about the rest of them.

The One Memory of Flora Banks

memory of flora banks.jpgThe One Memory of Flora Banks/big> (Philomel, 2017) by Emily Barr is such a heart-breaking story. Here's the opening line: "I am at the top of a hill, and although I know I have done something terrible, I have no idea what it is."

Flora has memory problems. She writes herself reminders on sticky notes, and on her arm to help her navigate the world. But often she is surprised that she is not ten--the age she was when she had surgery to remove a brain tumor--but seventeen and wondering why she is in an adult body. However, the night she kisses Drake, her best friend's boyfriend, everything changes. She can remember this memory without written reminders. Of course, her best friend Paige is angry at her. Flora lets her parents leave for Paris to go take care of her brother with them thinking Paige will be with her, but Paige isn't coming. Flora keeps reading "be brave" on this journey that changes her life.

This is British author Emily Barr's first novel. The book is available in 26 languages! Her second novel for young adults, The Truth and Lies of Ella Black, is a thriller that came out in 2018.

Emily Barr is also an adult book novelist. Read more about her on her website.

The Sun Is Also a Star

sunisalsoastar.jpgThe Sun Is Also a Star (Delacorte Press, 2016) by Nicola Yoon is an impactful book that covers a very short time period in the two protagonists lives. The book is mainly told from the viewpoints of two teens from immigrant families. We also get some insight with viewpoints of some other characters.

First, we meet Daniel who feels like he has to accept his destiny and become a doctor because his oldest brother has screwed up. Daniel's family is from Korea.

Then we met Natascha who is angry at her father. Her mother says she should give up on trying to keep them in America. Her little brother thinks Jamaica will be better.

The two meet on the day Natascha's family is being deported and the day Daniel is being interviewed for Yale. And what an amazing, frustrating, busy day they have. These two couldn't be more different. One is a romantic, the other a scientist--you'll have to read it to see which is which.

How could a story like this have a satisfactory ending? Well, it does.

This book is a National Book Award Finalist, Michael L. Printz Honor Book, and New York Times Best Seller.

Nicola's unofficial bio makes me smile. I haven't yet read her book Everything, Everything. I hope she keeps writing.


The Only Road

TheOnlyRoad.jpegThe Only Road (Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2016) by Alexandra Diaz is a book I wish I could get everyone to read.

After the murder of his cousin Miguel, twelve-year-old Jaime and his fifteen-year-old cousin Angela either have to join the destructive gangs in their village or leave Guatemala. To keep them safe their families spend everything they have to get the two the United States where Jaime's brother Tomas lives. But once the two are on their way, they are on their own. They face discovery by la migra, gang violence, death by train, hunger, thievery, thirst all in their quest for a safe place to live.

The Only Road is inspired by true events (not the author's) and is a Pura Belpré Honor book!

Alexandra Diaz has this at the head of her website: "Writing: to experience life in someone else's shoes." That's one of the reasons we read and why I'd like others to read this book.

Alexandra is also the author of Good Girls Don't Lie--a YA novel--and other books. On her bio page there are lots of links to interviews, too.


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