Recently in The Nitty Gritty of Children's Writing Category

Finding Comp Titles

shelf-159852_640.pngRecently, I was at a writer's conference where someone asked, "What do you do when you can't find comp titles?". (Comp titles are comparable titles.) Sometimes writers say, "nothing is out there like this book." That's highly unlikely, especially if the book fits a category--picture book, middle grade, young adult, etc.--and it fits a genre. If it doesn't fall in any of these, perhaps the writer needs to rethink the project--there may be a reason "nothing is out there" like it.

How I find comp titles

First, I go to Amazon and search in the category. (You could use Barnes & Noble as well.) Let's say I'm looking for comp titles for a picture book. I start by searching by subject in picture books. For example, manners, or musical instruments, or fun in the sun. Be sure and use the check boxes on the left to help you narrow your search. I usually check hardcover. Since I mostly write fiction, I specify that as well.

Next, I search by characters. If my characters are animals, I'll search for fiction picture books on that specific animal. E.g. How many picture books are there with a tree frog as the main character? Probably not many, which can help your book stand out. I know there are a lot of picture books with chicken, dog, or cat main characters.

If neither of those options work, try searching for the tone of the book, such as humor or sweet, whatever fits your manuscript best. Or search for the theme of your book.

You can also go to a local bookstore and ask someone in the children's section to show you recent books on a specific topic, character, or written in a specific tone.

Reading books

And, of course, I read the books I find to see if they really are a good comparable title.

I also do a lot of reading of picture books and may find comp titles that way as well.

Using multiple comp titles

Sometimes it takes two or three titles to express your book, so your pitch or query letter would say, "My book is like Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code meets Mo Willems' The Thank You Book. (Note these are recent titles, which make the best comps.) You can also use movies or TV shows as one of your comps. "My YA manuscript is like The Truman Show meets M.T. Anderson's Feed." (These aren't recent, but would give the editor or agent an instant picture of your manuscript.)

Usually you don't want to use the blockbuster books, such as Harry Potter or Hunger Games as comparison titles. Although, if you were comparing it to some aspect of the book, that might work too. "My book has a main character who doesn't fit in like Luna Lovegood in HP, but the story is more reminiscent of Laurel Gale's Dead Boy."

Agents and editors I've heard speak agree that comp titles will be out there. You just have to do the research to find them.

For further reading on this topic go to "Finding Comp Titles for Your Novel" by Annie Neugebauer and "Comp titles" by Janet Reid. Both of these posts are from 2012, but have great info.

Writing for Children's Religious Magazines

christ&lamb.pngI've sold over 75 short stories to a variety of religious magazines. Some of these stories were resales as the markets don't have the same audience, but have very similar beliefs. Some stories were tweaked to fit a specific religion. A few of the magazines are no longer in print. Others have gone through transitions and name changes.

Beliefs Vary

Each magazine has its own flavor and set of beliefs. When reading sample stories, you'll find certain magazines specifically mention God and/or Jesus, while others don't. In all cases, there are things you need to know when writing for the religious market.

Theme Lists/Editorial Calendars

Many of the religious magazines can also be called "church take home papers." In other words, 52 issues are printed for each Sunday/Sabbath of the year. Others, are monthly magazines with several stories/articles per issue. Not only does this mean they need lots of material (fiction and nonfiction), but these magazines often have some kind of theme. It can be a yearly theme, a monthly theme, or an issue by issue theme. There may be Bible verses to read along with theme topics. Often, theme lists, sometimes called editorial calendars, are available online. If not, you'll need to write to the magazine for them. For one magazine I've gotten on a mailing list to receive the themes by email.

Writers Guidelines

All have submission guidelines--many of which are online. These will tell you word counts--some will be ranges, others will be up to a specific word limit. You may find deadlines for submissions. You'll find information on the rights the magazine buys. (If you need further information on rights, go here.) http://www.susanuhlig.com/2013/10/is-that-right.html The focus of the magazine is usually mentioned here as well.

But one of the biggest "guidelines" is reading the stories in the magazine itself. This is where you'll really see whether the stories are simply moral or "good," or whether God is referenced or talked to, or both. You'll get to see if story settings are inside or outside of church--often the most religious magazines use both.

The Characters

Most will have one main character either overcoming a problem or learning something. (That doesn't mean these stories have to be preachy, although some will lean more that way than others.) Someone might help them with the problem, but the main character has to be in control and do the actual solving. Because of what happens in the story, the character will change in some way.

Editorial Relationships

Often, if you break into print with one magazine, you can sell more stories to the same magazine. If you do, you may develop a relationship with the editor(s). I had one editor tell me she liked my story, but since the magazine didn't promote contemporary Christian music, they couldn't use it. Without a relationship, all I'd have gotten would have been a straight rejection. I've also had editors ask me to fill holes in their lists of stories. After receiving a specific topic, I usually had to propose a couple ideas before getting the go ahead to write.

Rejections

You may find as I did that some magazines are really hard to break into. In fact, some I never wrote something that they accepted. You may also find some rejections are a "not now" as they had too many stories that fit the topic. That means you can send the story later when it again fits a topic. I've also resent stories when a new editor comes along. This means you have to keep accurate records on your submissions and on the magazine.

Sales

My favorite sales to religious markets were the magazine I read when I was a teen and the magazine my daughters read when they were teens. One of the fun things with resales is seeing how differently the same story can be illustrated. But the best is knowing that there are children and teens being encouraged by my stories.

A Fresh Look at Our Writing

refreshment-438399_1280.jpegI was once again reminded how important a fresh look is on a manuscript. This week a writer friend asked me to look at a picture book manuscript that her agent had said was "too mean spirited." It was a retelling of an old story--good guys against a bad guy--with a very modern twist. I thought it was hilarious. I'd seen several versions and really couldn't see much to tone down. Then yesterday she showed it to a mutual critique partner who had not seen the story before. She pointed out areas that would soften the story. This third writer had fresh eyes and was so right in her suggestions.

I love this imagery from Arthur Polotnik: "You write to communicate to the hearts and minds of others what's burning inside you. And we edit to let the fire show through the smoke." When we are writing our own view is hindered by smoke. We're excited about what we're creating--in love with our characters, our words. Setting aside the manuscript and coming back to it later when the fire has cooled, let's some of that smoke of infatuation clear.

When we've looked at a manuscript over and over and over, we get blind. It's too easy to skim because we "know" what it says. Suzanne Paschall says it this way, "Tired eyes become blind to errors that jump out to fresh eyes..." Somehow we need a splash of water in the face to wake us up.

Right now I'm going through my own manuscript using comments from my critique group. Mine is a novel in verse and once I gave the complete manuscript to my partners, I've didn't look at it until I got their feedback. (I also tried not to think about the story at all.) Their questions and comments are helping me see it afresh. It helps me see what I know but didn't put on the page. It helps me see where I wasn't clear or left out details that will add to the story. It challenges me. And I know it is making my story better.

Soon, I'll reread the whole story again to get it ready to send out on submission. This time I'll probably first change the font so it looks different to me. This trick can help fool our eyes into seeing the words afresh.

Do you have other tools you use to look at your writing with fresh eyes? If so, please share in the comments.


Resources for Writing for Children's Magazines

Resources for Writing for Children's Magazines.jpeg
ARTICLES/BLOG ENTRIES/PODCASTS

"5 Reasons Novelists Should Write & Publish Short Stories" by Chuck Sambuchino

"7 Online Magazines for Kids That Are Worth a Read" by Saikat Basu

"Best Magazines for Kids Who Love Getting Mail as Much as We Do" by Mary Fetzer

"The Christian Children's Market: A Place for Beginning Writers" by Marcia Laycock - although dated, it has good info

"Creating Characters for Children's Magazines" - ICL Podcast

"Magazines for Kids" (online)

"Tips for Breaking Into Children's Writing Through Magazines" by Mary Lou Carney

"Top 10 Kids Magazines" - these are the ones it will probably be more difficult to break into

"Top Ten Writing Mistakes Made By New Children's Writers" by Suzanne Lieurance

"Writing Children's Nonfiction for Magazines - Mistakes to Avoid"

"Writing for Children's Magazines" by Eugie Foster

"Writing for Teen Magazines" (nonfiction) by Ursula Furi-Perry

"Writing for the Christian Children's Market" - Guest Interview with Author Kathleen Muldoon

The following are links to relevant posts I wrote on this blog:

"Do You Remember?" (writing for teen magazines)

"Is That Right?" (magazine rights)

"Keeping Track" (of submissions)

"Magazine Story or Picture Book"

"Nonfiction Writing" - includes more resources

"On the Hunt for Ideas"

"Professional Problem Maker"

"Selling Photos to Magazines"

"Swift Fiction: The Short Story in Focus"

"Theme List Tactics"

MAGAZINE GUIDELINES (and THEME LISTS/EDITORIAL CALENDARS)

Magazine Markets for Children's Writers - buy the current year here

Markets for Children's Writers - databases separated into children and teens and paying and nonpaying

Writing for Children's Magazines, An Ezine - quarterly - plus info about whether magazines are open or closed and links to guidelines



Save Me!

lifebelt.jpgI was helping a new writer and she was confused about versions of her story/article. This is a common problem for many writers as it requires some computer literacy that people often don't have. Here's what I suggested to her:

  • Have a computer folder for the book project. Hers was a collection of stories from mission trips to Haiti. Her folder logically says HAITI STORIES.
  • Inside that folder have a folder for each individual story. One of her stories is titled "Anesthesia by Song"--don't you want to know what that's about?! Her inside folder where all copies of this story are can simply be ANESTHESIA BY SONG.
  • - I also use this folder to save notes, resources, etc. related to my article or story.
  • - I might have a separate folder labeled NOTES or INFO inside the story/article folder if I have a number of different documents.
  • If you want to have different versions of a story/article, name the files with dates or a number. E.g. Travel Story 4-15-17.docx, Travel Story 5-1-17.docx, Travel Story 1.docx, Travel Story 2.docx. (Or .doc for older computers.) At a glance, you'll see which is the newest version. You could also label them Travel Story first draft.docx through Travel Story final.docx.

Whether you are on a PC using the file manager (looks like a folder at the bottom of your screen) or on a MAC using Finder, organizing your work helps you know where everything is. The folders within another folder, the files within a folder, all can be in alphabetical order which makes it easy to find the file you need when you need it.

My friend was surprised to hear you can have folders within folders. I liken it to a wide hanging folder in a desk drawer. It can have multiple manila folders. But the computer is even better as you can keep nesting as far as you need.

But how do you save different versions of a document?

There are multiple methods:


  • The one I find myself using the most often is opening the document itself and then clicking on "save as" and adding a version number or date. This leaves my new document open and I can immediately start work.

  • Another option is to go where the file is and make a copy. When you save the copy, the system will add a number to differentiate it or will add the word copy. Then you can rename the copy, open it and get to work.

"Save as" is useful in other ways too.


  • Saving a backup copy to another location such as Dropbox, google drive, a USB device, etc.

  • Saving the first ten pages for a consultation/critique. Of course, you can also copy the first ten pages and paste in a new document, but you probably will lose your headers.


I liked having the "save as" icon on my toolbar, so I can click on it easily.

Another writer expressed this week how she lost six hours of work when preparing a PowerPoint presentation. We've all lost work and it is very frustrating. Here's what I do to help avoid that:


  • Name the document or presentation right away. An unnamed doc or ppt is much more difficult to find if you have a computer crash. I've also clicked on "don't save" when I meant to click on save when closing a document. Arghh!

  • When you save the file that first time, make sure you put it in a logical place so you'll know where to find it.

  • Save frequently as you work. I suggest every twenty to thirty minutes. (The "save" icon on the toolbar makes this quick and easy. Command/Control S is the keyboard shortcut.)

  • If you're inserting create commons images you've copied from the Internet, I suggest downloading them then insert versus copy and paste. You'll have the downloaded copies in your downloads folder as a backup.

And speaking of backups... Make sure you are backing up your documents and files. For further info, go to this blog post.


Finding Comp Titles

Writing for Children's Religious Magazines

A Fresh Look at Our Writing

Resources for Writing for Children's Magazines

Save Me!

Run Away Words

Novel-sized Problem

Emotions and Feelings

Sensory Details

Taglines and Beats

Successful Cover Letters

Diverse Books

Online Resources for Children's Writers and Illustrators

Rhyming Picture Books

Preparation and Practice for Public Speaking

Public Speaking Phobia

Authors in the Classroom

Why Twitter?

What Should I Describe?

Magazine Story or Picture Book?

Nonfiction Writing

Do It Myself!

Swift Fiction - The Short Story in Focus

What Stops Me Reading!

Distancing Your Reader

Resizing Photos for Use on Websites

Overwriting

Are List Serves a Service or a Waste of Time?

Reducing Word Count

MS Wish List

How to Stand Out

NAMING CHARACTERS - FROM MARY'S NOTEBOOK

Kids Reading Books and Saying What They Think

Retreat!

Selling Photos to Magazines

Poor Man's Copyright, a Myth

Missing Students

The Right Number of Characters

What Do You Do When You're Stuck?

Naming Your Character

Considering Self-Publishing?

When Educational Publishers Ask for Your Résumé

Say What?

Write Well When the Muse Is Sleeping

Writing Process Blog Tour

Truth in Fiction

Plodding or Plotting

Raise the stakes, honey!

One Size Does NOT Fit All

BACK UP!

175 Proof

He Thought to Himself and Other Excesses

Confessions of a Writer Easily Distracted

Is That Right?

Writing Business Expenses

Subjective

The Hero's Journey for Magazine Writers

Altitude and Attitude - Adult or Child?

Slow Down, You Move too Fast

Kidz Only! Adults Keep Out!

A Dark Side of Social Media

Do you struggle with grammar?

Can children and teens get their work published?

Patience Required

I'm a Work-in-Progress

Illustrator Resources

Inspiration from Kate DiCamillo

Are Listserves a Service or a Waste of Time?

Writing and Life Balance

How To Start Querying an Agent

WEBSITE Q&A

Nancy I. Sanders on Writing Nonfiction

Heartbroken?

Perfecting Dialogue Punctuation

Ouch! Thin Skin!

Agents Telling What They Want

School Visits, the Extended Version

Going Back to School

One of 75 finalists

Make It Work for You

Down with Discouragement!

Do as I Say

Professional Problem Maker

4 Ways to Make Your Characters "Talk Different"

Picture Book Month

Work-for-Hire Resources

Work-for-Hire Wisdom

Work-for-Hire also known as WFH

Picture Perfect Picture Books

Picture Book Resources

Author Talks versus Workshops

My Favorite Online Resources

Technicalities - More Thoughts on Public Speaking

Do as I Say

Theme List Tactics

What Would Sue Do?

Attribution or Action?

Don't Throw in the Towel

Do You Remember?

Dragged to the Podium

Double Identity - Pen Names

Before You Sign: Contract Resources

Welcome, Diane Bailey, Work-for-hire Champion

Ready, Set, Goal

An Editor's Day

How'd You Get That Gig?

On the Hunt for Ideas

Bloggers Supporting Other Bloggers

Shadowing a Submission

Give up or press on?

Turning Ideas Into Stories - Workshop

After the Critique

Keeping Track

The Synopsis Shrink

Mind Your Cs and Qs - part three

Mind Your Cs and Qs - part two

Mind Your Cs and Qs - part one

Standard Manuscript Format

CUT IN THE CRITIQUE

Critique Methods

Market Research Resources - Agents

THE SANDWICH OF CRITIQUE

CRITIQUE GROUPS: GO FOR IT!

Organizations and Groups

Writing a Novel? Where Does It Fit?

Meeting Editors and Agents - In Person

Meet Editors and Agents - Online

Book It! - Recording What You Read

Theme and Premise

Self-Editing Tips

The Story Ladder or Novel Timeline

Showing Versus Telling

Read, Read, Read

The Power of a Good First Line

Hooking your Reader

Listen to the Voices

DIALOGUE TIPS

Viewpoint in Children's Fiction

Making Friends: Character Development

Glossary of Publishing Terms

Genre Resources

Children's Book Genres

Why Write?